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Skin & Subcutaneous Tissue


{"ops":[{"insert":"Diagnosis and reasoning"},{"insert":"\n","attributes":{"header":1}},{"insert":"New-onset unilateral nasal complaints in an elderly person are highly suspicious for a sinonasal mass, especially when combined with extranasal features involving the ipsilateral orbit.\n \nThus, anterior rhinoscopy is a good first step in the evaluation of this patient; this confirms the clinical suspicion by revealing a large, friable mass with contact bleeding in the affected nostril.\n \nGiven his age, a neoplastic lesion is a very real concern; infectious and inflammatory etiologies are the other possibilty, but are clinically less likely given the absence of other supportive symptoms.\n \nWith respect to neoplasms, while benign tumors are far more common, even at this age, the gross appearance of the tumor is worrisome of a malignancy.\n \nIn turn, malignancies are most often epithelial in origin, including squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, adenocystic carcinoma, or mucosal melanoma; malignant lymphoma is the most common nonepithelial malignancy.\n\nGiven the histological diversity "}]}

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