In Her Blood

Blood & Lymphoreticular System


{"ops":[{"insert":"Diagnosis and reasoning"},{"insert":"\n","attributes":{"header":1}},{"insert":"The patient who presents following a first seizure is not an uncommon encounter in the emergency department; similar to other emergencies, the initial priority should always be assessment, resuscitation, and stabilization.\n\nIn parallel, the most common causes of seizure should be rapidly ruled out; these include electrolyte and metabolic disturbances, central nervous system (CNS) infections, cerebrovascular accidents, and drug overdose\/poisoning. Given the history of hypertension, hypertensive encephalopathy (HE) should also be considered.\n\nHowever, there are no clinical findings which particularly favor the above entities, while the initial battery of tests is also negative.\n\nThat said, her examination does reveal several worrisome findings: jaundice, pallor, and widespread petechiae; a follow up complete blood count (CBC) and blood film are mandatory.\n\nThe CBC confirms the presence of moderate anemia and severe thrombocytopenia; the blood film is even more alarming, demonstrating th"}]}

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