Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

Endocrine System


Clinicals - History

Fact Explanation
{"ops":[{"insert":"Introduction"},{"insert":"\n"}]}
{"ops":[{"insert":"Gestational diabetes melitus (GDM) is chronic hyperglycemia that is first recognized during pregnancy. This hyperglycemia, in most cases, is the result of impaired glucose tolerance secondary to pancreatic \u03b2-cell dysfunction, on a background of chronic insulin resistance.\n\nGDM tends to develop during the second or third trimester. It is most often diagnosed during the universal screening for GDM conducted at 24-28 weeks of gestation."}]}
{"ops":[{"insert":"Risk factor: age"},{"insert":"\n"}]}
{"ops":[{"insert":"A maternal age \u226540 years is associated with an increased risk of impaired glucose tolerance during pregnancy."}]}
{"ops":[{"insert":"Risk factor: ethnicity"},{"insert":"\n"}]}
{"ops":[{"insert":"Women of African-American, Hispanic, Middle-Eastern, Native American, Pacific Islander, and South Asian origin are more likely to develop GDM."}]}
{"ops":[{"insert":"Risk factor: past GDM"},{"insert":"\n"}]}
{"ops":[{"insert":"Around one-third of women with GDM develop the condition in a future pregnancy."}]}
{"ops":[{"insert":"Risk factor: positive family history"},{"insert":"\n"}]}
{"ops":[{"insert":"The presence of a first-degree relative with diabetes mellitus or a sister with GDM increases the risk of developing GDM."}]}
{"ops":[{"insert":"Risk factor: sedentary lifestyle"},{"insert":"\n"}]}
{"ops":[{"insert":"An inactive lifestyle and westernized diet are both modifiable risk factors for GDM."}]}
{"ops":[{"insert":"Risk factor: dysglycemic medications"},{"insert":"\n"}]}
{"ops":[{"insert":"Regular treatment with corticosteroids, antipsychotics, or other medications with an anti-insulin effect is another modifiable risk factor for GDM."}]}
{"ops":[{"insert":"Risk factor: high gestational weight gain"},{"insert":"\n"}]}
{"ops":[{"insert":"During the period of gestation, maternal weight gain \u003E22 lb\/year (\u003E10kg\/year) confers a more than two-fold increased risk for GDM."}]}
{"ops":[{"insert":"Introduction"},{"insert":"\n"}]}
{"ops":[{"insert":"Gestational diabetes melitus (GDM) is chronic hyperglycemia that is first recognized during pregnancy. This hyperglycemia, in most cases, is the result of impaired glucose tolerance secondary to pancreatic \u03b2-cell dysfunction, on a background of chronic insulin resistance.\n\nGDM tends to develop during the second or third trimester. It is most often diagnosed during the universal screening for GDM conducted at 24-28 weeks of gestation."}]}
{"ops":[{"insert":"Risk factor: age"},{"insert":"\n"}]}
{"ops":[{"insert":"A maternal age \u226540 years is associated with an increased risk of impaired glucose tolerance during pregnancy."}]}
{"ops":[{"insert":"Risk factor: ethnicity"},{"insert":"\n"}]}
{"ops":[{"insert":"Women of African-American, Hispanic, Middle-Eastern, Native American, Pacific Islander, and South Asian origin are more likely to develop GDM."}]}
{"ops":[{"insert":"Risk factor: past GDM"},{"insert":"\n"}]}
{"ops":[{"insert":"Around one-third of women with GDM develop the condition in a future pregnancy."}]}
{"ops":[{"insert":"Risk factor: positive family history"},{"insert":"\n"}]}
{"ops":[{"insert":"The presence of a first-degree relative with diabetes mellitus or a sister with GDM increases the risk of developing GDM."}]}
{"ops":[{"insert":"Risk factor: sedentary lifestyle"},{"insert":"\n"}]}
{"ops":[{"insert":"An inactive lifestyle and westernized diet are both modifiable risk factors for GDM."}]}
{"ops":[{"insert":"Risk factor: dysglycemic medications"},{"insert":"\n"}]}
{"ops":[{"insert":"Regular treatment with corticosteroids, antipsychotics, or other medications with an anti-insulin effect is another modifiable risk factor for GDM."}]}
{"ops":[{"insert":"Risk factor: high gestational weight gain"},{"insert":"\n"}]}
{"ops":[{"insert":"During the period of gestation, maternal weight gain \u003E22 lb\/year (\u003E10kg\/year) confers a more than two-fold increased risk for GDM."}]}

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